Your Symptoms and Cell Efficiency

One of the things we get asked all the time is, “What makes NeuropathyDR different?” This is a really good question. For anybody who suffers (or loves someone who does) from peripheral neuropathy or another form of chronic pain, it can be very frustrating to sort through all the details. Treating both your symptoms and cell efficiency is how we are able to provide good treatment based in science…but here is what you must realize first:

Significant improvement in the quality of life can happen by making a few simple changes in your diet and lifestyle and adding special combinations of good treatment.

Our background is in health care and nutrition. So, when I first began intensely treating pain & neuropathy patients in 2008, we knew that improving their underlying health—especially how nerve cells process energy—had to help improve many patients’ peripheral neuropathy and other forms of nerve damage or chronic pain. Of course, there are some patients we cannot help. But we do find that even in patients with genetic neuropathies or other extremely difficult-to-treat cases, significant improvement in the quality of life can happen by making a few simple changes and adding special combinations of good neuropathy treatments.

Your nervous system is made up of billions of cells called neurons. Neurons are highly sensitive to their own environmental changes; things like long-term oxygen starvation due to cigarette smoking, or carrying around too much body weight for too long. Our society is now developing diabetes at alarming rate, in younger and younger age groups. This is largely due to poor food and lifestyle choices. We are also living longer, as a byproduct of better infection control, better chemotherapy drugs, and surgeries.

These things all bring with them increased chances for developing chronic and painful conditions such as peripheral neuropathy. The reason for this is, all of the things we have talked about today will affect how our body processes energy—leading to the development of peripheral neuropathy. Wherever possible, helping to restore energy efficiency to nerve cells can make a tremendous difference in many patients with peripheral neuropathy. And that is why our treatment program includes better nutrition and body motion—improving both your symptoms and cell efficiency by adding therapies such as neurostimulation, laser, and physical therapy, often with nutritional supplementation.

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Neuropathy Symptoms and Cell Energy is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

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Developing a Better Self-Care Plan

If you’re reading this, you likely already understand that so much of getting better when faced with a serious health issue and especially neuropathy and chronic pain is a do-it-for yourself project. And you likely realize a better self care plan can be a BIG piece of the puzzle.

It is also unrealistic for any doctor to say or any patient to assume that his or her own self-care does not have a major impact on their health, and yes of course recovery from any illness.

Because so many people find the topic so overwhelming, what I suggest is that you start by making very simple list. This is step one of your better self care plan.

For example, do you have the more common known risk factors that can cause or aggravate your health problems? This includes things like cigarette smoking, being as little as 10 to 20 pounds overweight, being inactive or sedentary, and consuming too much alcohol?

Do you now have to take more medications because your diet has been so poor?

You see all of these things can aggravate most health issues especially when neuropathy and chronic pain become part of them.

Perhaps there are genetic or family issues, which you cannot change completely.

But could you do a better job of taking care of yourself?

Could you walk more, stretch every day at least once, take your advised supplements and follow a plant based diet plan, and watch the timing and composition of your meals?

Are you using the NDGen® or wearable laser treatment devices you bought from us?

Could you do a better job of working on your stress, your high blood pressure and migraines?

Are you regularly exercising, and taking “time-outs” every day for meditation or prayer?

You see where I am going. One of the most important things you can do right now is to make a better self care plan list for yourself. Share this only with yourself and your health care professionals.

And then, choose just one thing to work on today!

Rather than becoming overwhelmed, it is much more productive to focus on one change at a time. Once that change has been activated, move onto the next. And so on, one day at a time.

When you start behaving in this way, you’ll likely find a better self care plan can improve results, and provide greater success when  working with our treatment professionals!

This is after all is why many hundreds more patients are joining our ranks every week, and we so thank you for being part of our extended family!

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Call Us 24/7 at 781-659-7989

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Easy Home Tidiness Habits To Help You Reduce Stress

Coming home to a messy or cluttered house at the end of a long work day is not conducive to relaxation. It’s that simple. Stress over time can be devastating to our health, so it is important to make our homes into places of peace, a refuge from the cares of the outside world. Keeping your home tidy is an easy way to decrease stress.

Benefits of Reducing Stress

It’s no secret that stress is bad for our health. Not only can it lead to heart problems, there have been suggested links to cancer and dementia as well. Putting some time aside each day to relax, to have a peaceful space where you can let go of your worries, may aid your physical health. You may help reduce your risk of high blood pressure or even heart attacks if you take time to relax. Stress can impair memory and your ability to learn, and, as mentioned, may be a factor in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Aside from physical benefits, you may simply feel happier if you consciously choose to unwind each day. Stress may trigger relapses in depression and can lead to the buildup of cortisol, which can dampen the brain’s ability to produce serotonin and dopamine. Overall, it’s a good idea to make sure you have a space you can relax in every single day. Cleaning your home and making sure it is organized can help to create that environment.

Organization Practices

Part of keeping your home tidy and stress-free is having a good organization system in place. Lazy Susans can be used in more places than the kitchen cupboard. Clear up counter space in your bathroom by putting your lotions, face creams, toothpaste, or whatever you use daily on a lazy Susan to give you easy access and keep counters from being cluttered. Organize your linen closet by keeping sheets neat and folded together inside a pillow case. Add hooks or shelves to your bedroom to make sure you don’t leave jackets lying on floors, and books or purses askew on the bedside table.

Focus on the Bedroom

If you focus on creating a relaxing environment in one room, make it your bedroom. This should be your sanctuary from the rest of the world. Keep your chest of drawers tidy by using dividers so your clothes won’t be mixed and messy. Using multiple waste bins around the room can keep floors clear. If you are tight on space, you can transform your headboard into shelving, which can double as a nightstand as well. Whatever you do, make sure you keep your room feeling light and as stress-free as possible. This is the place you sleep, perhaps meditate, and should be a place of calm serenity. Adding scented candles in your preferred fragrance or using warmed oils can aid in relaxation. Hang soothing art and use light fixtures that make you feel at home in your bedroom.

A Home for Everything

It’s so easy, especially after having a long, tiring day, to strip your work day away when you get home. Your keys may go on the table and your shoes may wind up beneath the couch. Your purse may lie on the kitchen counter, and your jacket may end up half on a chair, half on the floor. This clutter can make a space, especially a small one, feel claustrophobic. Take fifteen minutes to assign “homes” for your high-use items. Make it a ritual to put things in their place right when you get home. Having a clear space with tidy walkways not only makes being home easier, but it feels like a breath of fresh air.

Your home should not add to anxiety or the stresses in your life. It should be your refuge and be somewhere you can safely unwind. By making little changes, you can ensure that your house is the perfect place to relax at the end of each day.

About Our Guest Author:

Alice Robertson began her career in the home organization industry as a professional house cleaner. After cleaning and organizing her clients’ homes for years, she decided to open her own home organization business. Over the years, she has built an impressive client list, helping to make spaces in homes and businesses more functional. She recently created tidyhome.info as a place to share the great cleaning and organizing advice she has developed over the years.

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The Hard Truth About Dairy

You Won’t Hear This Advice From Many Doctors, But This One Factor May Change the Effectiveness of Your Neuropathy Diet.

The consumption of dairy products has always been a highly charged topic in nutrition. Here is the hard truth about dairy.

On the one hand, there is a sizable lobby advocating for the U.S. dairy industry. On the other hand, there is overwhelming scientific evidence that regular consumption of dairy products is a pretty bad idea for human beings.

In short, if you are wrestling with whether to include milk and other dairy products in your neuropathy diet, any contemplation of this question leads to a straightforward conclusion.

More than half of the human population has trouble digesting milk, leading to digestion problems, allergic reactions, and eventually elevated levels of “bad fats” in your body. What’s worse, there is a hormonal growth factor contained in most dairy products that is known to instigate several different types of cancer, including prostate and breast cancer. One specific kind of milk sugar called galactose is linked to ovarian cancer.

And the regular consumption of dairy is additionally linked to the likelihood of developing type 1 diabetes, which is a major risk factor for neuropathic pain.

All of this means that a neuropathy diet that eliminates dairy (as well as gluten) is one of the most effective ways to reduce inflammation and pain associated with neuropathy and chronic pain.

It’s best to make a gradual shift in your diet so that the changes you instill can be permanent. There are many dairy alternatives out there, including products made from coconut, rice, and almonds. Just watch out for any added sugar or thickening agents like carrageenan.

As always, I urge you to become your own best health advocate. HERE is a copy of our NeuropathyDR Diet Plan!
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For more information on neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://NeuropathyDR.com.

Patients and Doctors are invited to call us at 781-659-7989 at 12:30 EST Monday, Wednesday and Thursday to talk with the next available senior clinician.

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How to Use Meditation for Chronic Neuropathy Treatment

Chronic neuropathy treatment can be supported with meditation—and it doesn’t have to be fancy, structured, or even spiritual in nature. Here’s a list of 5 ways to begin a meditation practice today on your own, for free.

When you think of meditation, do you picture a very serene-looking monk sitting cross-legged on a cushion? Or maybe a young man or woman in yoga gear on a cliff by the ocean? Maybe you’ve heard that there’s only one right way to meditate, and you’d need to watch a DVD or attend a class to find out how.

Well I have great news for you! The truth is that you don’t need a class, a DVD, or a perfect body to meditate. You don’t even have to sit on a cushion on the floor. Best of all, meditating is so easy, you can start today.

Here are 5 kinds of meditation that don’t require any kind of training. You can start with just 5 or 10 minutes each day.

1. Sitting meditation

Sitting doesn’t have to mean sitting on a cushion. You can sit upright in any chair that is comfortable for you. The key factor is in having appropriate posture. Think of your head as a balloon that is rising toward the ceiling on a string; let it float over your shoulders. Now think of having a strong, upright back and an open, receiving heart. Sit in this way for 5 to 10 minutes and just notice any thoughts or feelings that arise, like clouds floating by in the sky.

2. Walking meditation

This is a special way of walking that holds less danger of repetitive stress, because you won’t cover much ground in 5 minutes. It might more accurately be called balancing meditation. Simply slow down each step and notice every aspect of it: shifting your weight onto one foot, letting the other foot rise forward, contacting the ground, shifting your weight again. Then repeat on the other side. It’s just like walking, but at a glacial pace that allows you to really notice the sensations of movement and balance.

3. Meditating in bed

For those who find sitting or walking meditation too painful due to neuropathy symptoms, the wonderful thing to know about meditation is that you can do it in any position—even lying down. (The Buddha himself said so!) The key practice isn’t your body position, although it’s best to be in a posture that allows for effective breathing. Instead, the key is in noticing sensations and thoughts and simply allowing them to pass by without judgment.

4. Mindfully doing a creative act

Meditation doesn’t even have to happen in stillness. It’s possible to engage in a daily meditative practice involving any creative act, such as cooking or creating music. Again, the key to a meditative practice is in being fully aware in each moment of how you are feeling, what you’re thinking, and what judgments are arising about the situation. If you find that your attention drifts, just gently bring it back to this moment.

5. Mindfully completing any household chore

Finally, meditation works with any activity, regardless of its nature. The dullest of household chores can be a form of meditation if they are done mindfully—that is, with your attention on sensation and awareness. For example, when you are washing the dishes after dinner, spend those 10 minutes noticing how the soapy water feels on your hands and being aware of the pattern of your breathing.

Meditation of any kind can be an effective stress relief and a self-help supplement for your chronic neuropathy treatment.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscribe to our newsletters at http://neuropathydr.com.

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Heel Pain: Common Causes and Treatments

If you’ve been experiencing a sharp pain in your heel, particularly after long periods of sitting or resting, plantar fasciitis could be to blame. With this painful condition, the tissue that connects your heel bone to your toes – called the plantar fascia – becomes inflamed or irritated. One of the most common causes of heel pain, plantar fasciitis typically brings about a stabbing sensation with each step you take, although the pain usually decreases the more you walk (the tissue become more stretched, easing some of the tension on your heel bone).

What are some causes of plantar fasciitis?

Typically, the plantar fascia acts as somewhat of a shock absorber for the arch in your foot. Too much tension, however, can leave tiny tears in the tissue; excessive tearing can lead to irritation and, with it, the condition of plantar fasciitis.

A few factors that could lead to plantar fasciitis include:

Weight: Being overweight can add too much stress on your plantar fascia, stretching it to the point of inflammation and pain.

Age: Plantar fasciitis is most often found in patients between the ages of 40 and 60.

Gender: Women, particularly during pregnancy, are more prone to plantar fasciitis than men.

Activity: Exercises and activities that place an unusual amount of stress on the heel – such as running and certain forms of dancing – can lead to plantar fasciitis.

Long periods of standing: People who spend their days on their feet on hard surfaces, such as teachers and waitresses, often find themselves suffering from plantar fasciitis.

What are the symptoms of plantar fasciitis?

Often, plantar fasciitis is associated with pain that:

• Comes about gradually (as opposed to a noticeable tear or strain)
• Is experienced in just one foot (although it can occur in both feet at the same time)
• Is significantly worse after long periods of rest, such as first thing in the morning

If you’ve been sitting or resting for a long period of time, make an effort to stretch the affected foot before standing. Slowly flex your foot, pulling it gently toward your leg, and then move it from side to side. You might also move your foot in large circles or try writing the alphabet with your toes. These movements can help stretch the plantar fascia, leaving it less tense when you put weight on your foot (and therefore decreasing the pain of first impact!).

Get Your Feet Moving to Keep Healthy!

Depending on the severity of your condition, chiropractic treatment might consist of:

• Ultrasound treatments
• Soft tissue mobilization
• Stretching
• Chiropractic adjustments
• Cold laser treatments
• Taping/bracing the injured foot

We can work with you or your loved one to determine the best treatment for your condition. Please call us at 781-659-7989 at to schedule a consultation today

JPH

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What Is Restless Leg Syndrome?

Restless Leg Syndrome can occur alongside peripheral neuropathy, or in patients who suffer from spinal stenosis. Patients with degenerative disc disease may also have RLS-like symptoms.

Very commonly, peripheral neuropathy is associated with profound sleep disturbance. In fact, sometimes this is what alerts the patient and the physicians that something is seriously wrong.

Perhaps, you may have heard of RLS, or Restless Leg Syndrome. RLS is a condition that is very common, and just like peripheral neuropathy, is often associated with other disorders.

Most commonly, patients will feel the sensation of crampiness, or an urgent need to move their legs about. This occurs during or at the hour of sleep.

We do know that RLS can occur alongside peripheral neuropathy. Another place where RLS like symptoms occur in the clinic, is in patients who suffer from a condition called spinal stenosis. Likewise, patients with degenerative disc disease may also have RLS-like symptoms.

We do know that just like neuropathy, patients that suffer from kidney disease, diabetes, may be predisposed towards developing RLS. Patients who consume caffeine, or take calcium-channel blockers may also suffer from RLS.

Just like in peripheral neuropathy, RLS is not always confined to the feet.

People can experience RLS-like symptoms in the upper thighs, or even the arms. Often, it is only movement, such as walking around, that stops the symptoms.

Although medication provides relief for some, it is important to pay attention to the factors that cause or worsen RLS and peripheral neuropathy.

And one of the biggest things that aggravate both of these conditions is emotional stress and upset.

Here’s the kicker, sleep disturbance is the major negative health impact of RLS. You may also be aware that sleep disturbance is one of the surest ways to aggravate almost any underlying health condition.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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The Benefits of a Carbohydrate-Controlled Diet

Many forms of peripheral neuropathy respond to carbohydrate-controlled diets.

We recently spoke about the impact of diet selection, especially carbohydrate consumption, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy. In our clinic, we’ve found that most neuropathy patients benefit greatly when they follow a carbohydrate-controlled diet plan.

Now the reality is, because many forms of peripheral neuropathy respond to carbohydrate-controlled diets, that maintaining body weight and overall body composition is critically important to beating neuropathy.

But sometimes simple dietary changes are not enough, and a more radical approach is necessary. This is where professionally supervised weight loss programs and dietary retraining can be incredibly powerful.

A healthy diet should include[1]:

• Whole grains and legumes to provide B vitamins to promote nerve health.  Whole grains promote the production of serotonin in the brain and will increase your feeling of well-being.
• Plant based proteins or lean meats,fish and eggs.
• Green, leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, and other greens) for calcium and magnesium. Both of these nutrients are vital to healthy nerve endings and health nerve impulse transmission and, as an added bonus, they give your immune system a boost.
• Yellow and orange fruits and vegetables (such as squash, carrots, yellow and orange bell peppers, apricots, oranges, etc.) for vitamins A and C to help repair your skin and boost your immune system.
• Sunflower seeds (unsalted), avocados, broccoli, almonds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, peanuts (unsalted), tomatoes and tomato products, sweet potatoes and fish for vitamin E to promote skin health and ease the pain of nutritional neuropathy.
• Ask your us for recommendations on a good multivitamin and mineral supplement to fill in any gaps in your nutrition plan.

Foods you should avoid:

• Coffee and other caffeinated drinks.
• Fried foods and all other fatty foods. Fatty foods suppress the immune system and that’s the last thing you need when you’re fighting nutritional neuropathy.
• Control the amount of animal protein you eat. High-protein foods elevate the amount of dopamine and norepinephrine which are both tied to high levels of anxiety and stress.
• Restrict intake of starchy vegetables, as they are high in carbohydrates: potatoes, peas, corn, yucca, parsnips, beans, and yams.
• Avoid drinking alcohol. Alcohol consumption limits the ability of the liver to remove toxins from the body and can make a bad situation worse.

If you’re suffering from neuropathy, it is vital that you gain control of your diet, understand carbohydrate and calorie restriction, opt for healthier food selections, and plan mealtimes so you don’t eat too late at night.

If you continue to struggle with your weight, or body composition, you should explore a carbohydrate-controlled diet plan as a viable treatment option.

A carbohydrate-controlled diet has proven extraordinarily beneficial for our neuropathy patients.

Keep in mind, getting your metabolism, that is your weight and body composition, under control is a key step forward.

It goes without saying that you will look better, and feel and function better mentally, physically, and usually spiritually as well.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

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[1] http://www.nutritionmd.org/health_care_providers/endocrinology/diabetes_complications_neuro.html

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Handling The Holiday Stress

Pay particular attention to your body during the holidays, especially if you have neuropathy or chronic pain!

Even for the healthy, the holidays can be incredibly stressful.

Some surveys have even found that people are more stressed by the period between Thanksgiving and Christmas than by asking the boss for a raise!

But when you have:

  • Diabetes
  • Diabetic neuropathy
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Post-Chemotherapy neuropathy

Since you now have the stress of the holidays to deal with too, your health could take a serious beating—that will take you months to recover from.

Here are some steps you can take to make the holidays (and the months following them) a little easier to deal with:

1. Understand How Stress Affects Your Body

Stress (both mental and physical) causes the body to release hormones that prompt the liver to secrete glucose. That can wreak havoc on your blood glucose levels if you suffer from diabetes. In Type 2 diabetics, stress can also block the release of insulin from the pancreas and leave that extra insulin floating around in the bloodstream. In Type 1 diabetes, the effects are a little different. Some Type 1 diabetics say that stress drives their glucose up, while others maintain that stress drives their glucose down. Either way, your energy levels are wrecked. On a good day, that can be difficult to deal with. At the holidays, it can be pure misery.

If you are feeling stressed and your energy is especially low, you are less likely to pay attention to your glucose levels, or eat as you know you should. Pay particular attention to your body during the holidays, and Handling The Holiday “Stress-a-Thon”

2. Do What You Can To Reduce Mental Stress

Many of the things that stress us at the holidays are easy to manage or control. Make your life as easy as possible during this trying time.

If traffic really works your nerves, leave home a little earlier or try getting to work by a different route and avoid the areas that are particularly congested.

If your boss is a nightmare, plan to take vacation around the holidays if at all possible, and give yourself a mental break.

Volunteer to help with the holiday activities of a local charity. Doing something good for someone else is a wonderful way to make someone else’s life better and make you feel good at the same time.

Resolve to start a new exercise program, learn a new skill, or start a hobby as soon as the holidays are over. Enlist a friend to do it with you so you can encourage each other. Giving yourself a goal and something to look forward to after the grind of the holidays is over will do wonders for your state of mind.

3. How Do You Cope?

Everyone has a coping style. Some people are the take-charge type and take steps immediately to solve their problems. Other people just accept the problem, recognize that they can’t fix it, acknowledge that it’s probably not as bad as it could be, and go their merry way. Still, others are hand wringers and feel perpetually out of control.

The take-chargers and accepters have less problems with stress, both at the holidays and on a daily basis—as a result, their blood glucose levels don’t become elevated.

4. Relax…

One of the most useful things you will ever learn (diabetic or not) is to relax. For many, the ability to relax is not natural, but it can be learned. Some ways to help you relax are:

Breathing Exercises
Sit down or lie down without your arms or legs crossed. Inhale deeply. Push as much air as possible out of your lungs. Repeat the process but , this time, relax your muscles while you exhale. Start with this exercise for 5 minutes at a time and increase your time until you’re practicing breathing at least 20 minutes at a time, once a day.

Progressive Relaxation Therapy
Tense your muscles then relax them. Lie still and repeat the process for 5 minutes at a time, at least once a day.

Exercise
We can’t say enough about the benefits of exercise. As we’ve said before, you don’t have to run a marathon to get the stress-reducing benefits of exercise. You can walk or stretch, too.

Watch Your Mindset
When it comes to reducing stress, a lot can be said for the power of positive thinking. It’s really easy to let your mind overwhelm you this time of year…

“I’ll never get it all done…”

“What if they don’t like what I give them?”

“Oh man, I have to spend time with my brother again this year…”

Just watch your mindset and you can eliminate much of the stress of the holiday season. Replace negative thoughts with positive ones. Say a prayer or recite a poem or a quote that makes you feel good. Think of something that makes you happy. It may sound trite, but go to your happy place.

Choose one or more of these methods to relax and do it daily. Relaxing doesn’t come naturally to us, but we can definitely learn to do it with practice, and the health benefits are beyond measure.

Face the fact that many holiday stressors are not going away. The relative you don’t get along with, the traffic, the never-ending list of things to do will always be there.

But you can learn to manage the holiday stress. And if you can learn to manage holiday stress, just think of what you can do the rest of the year.

Talk to your local NeuropathyDR™ doctor or physical therapist to explore ways to handle the holiday stress and make it a healthier and more enjoyable experience this—and every—year, even with neuropathy or chronic pain!

Join the conversation on Facebook!

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Neuropathy and Fatigue

In neuropathy, fatigue can be the result of pain, and emotional stress.

One of the things many neuropathy patients tell us is how tired they can feel form day to day. Now, fatigue is common in many health conditions and should never be taken lightly.

For example, profound fatigue with weight loss can be a sign of several diseases, including cancer.

Diabetics often report fatigue, as do those patients with anemia and simple over work and inadequate sleep.

In neuropathy, fatigue can be the result of pain, and emotional stress.

Sometimes it’s from the diseases that may have caused your neuropathy.

But one of the things we observed a few years back on is that when treating neuropathy patients who suffer from the most common types we see (sensory, due to diabetes, metabolic syndrome and chemotherapy) is that when good neuropathy treatment begins, fatigue starts to vanish too!

And we even find patients with more serious forms of neuropathy improved as well, though more slowly and not as completely.

You see, we know that in the most common forms of neuropathy, energy production by the body in general, and the nerve cells in particular is poor. I theorized early on that therapies that can boost metabolism or how our bodies efficiently “burn” fuel will very often help neuropathy patients regain function.

These therapies include some food compounds, supplements and exercise, as well as therapies like laser and microcurrent which help individual cells produce ATP, which is the energy powerhouse behind every living cell!

And as a side benefit, we see our diabetic and obese patients losing significant weight, and some dropping their blood sugars significantly and thus need for medications.

So here is the best news of all: When patients engage in neuropathy treatment programs that handle all the key pieces they can, fatigue fades away and energy and a profound sense of wellbeing return to many neuropathy patients!

For more information visit us at NeuropathyDR.com

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