Simple Steps to Better Foot Care

As you probably know, peripheral neuropathy most commonly afflicts the feet first. And most adults suffer from some type of foot problem as well. But there really are some simple steps to better foot care you can begin to do today!

How well do you take care of your feet?

Initially, better foot care comes something as a shock to most patients. Too many of us ignore our feet until we have a painful or debilitating disorder like neuropathy.

You see, foot pain and neuropathy is much more than pain, tingling and numbness.

Often times there are changes in sensation which affect your balance and your ability to walk normally. Commonly, the shape of your feet will change due to muscle weakness over time or after an injury. This why some of the orthotics you see above can be so very helpful.

There are also changes in skin texture. Patients with peripheral neuropathy and foot pain often find their feet become cold. Cracking of the skin becomes more common. Unfortunately, infections like toenail fungus can happen too. Foot ulcers can be devastating and lead to amputation or worse.

So let’s talk about some of the simple things that you can do on a daily basis to help proper foot care.

The first thing you can do is to make sure that your shoes fit properly. Do not ignore things such as overgrown toenails, which can affect proper shoe fit. If you’re diabetic, your nails should be professionally trimmed by a podiatrist at least once per month.

Next, consider using either light wool, silk or microfiber socks. These socks do not trap moisture, which can make infections and perspiration problems worse.

Finally, be very careful in your choice of bath and shower soaps. Be sure to thoroughly dry and visually inspect the tops and bottoms of your feet every day! There are natural products such as those containing Tea tree oil, which are beneficial in helping prevent athlete’s foot and common fungal infections.

In terms of care, we commonly advise use of our #NDGen, #wearablelaser and #orthotics all of which you can see in our clinics or HERE In Our Self-Care Store

Take better care of your feet every day, ask for our help early on and do not let issues go untreated or fester. and foot pain as well as #neuropathytreatment success will also be easier!

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Call or text the main office for personalized help anytime at all: 781-659-7989

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Why Does Neuropathy Foot Pain Hurt So Bad?

Millions of patients around the world wake up each day wondering, “why does this neuropathy foot pain have to ruin my day?” The pain, burning, numbness and tingling are sometimes just too much to bear. Many would rather just go back to sleep and pretend it’s not time to face the world.

Well, what if you could face the world with your neuropathy pain under control? What if there was a way to make it better? Would you be interested?

That’s a question many patients would say yes too immediately. But, sometimes people like to understand what’s happening that makes them hurt so bad.

What Causes Neuropathy Foot Pain?

Neuropathy foot pain can be difficult to understand because it’s caused by many factors. Here are just a few of the possible causes:

  • Diabetes
  • Chemotherapy
  • Injury
  • Idiopathic – this means we don’t even know the cause
  • Toxic exposure
  • Genetics
  • Metabolic problems
  • And there’s still more

What happens is that the nerves are damaged by one of these disease processes. Symptoms can range from sensory problems like temperature, pain or touch intolerances to muscle weakness and even paralysis. The neuropathy foot pain is directly related to damaged nerves in the feet and legs. Although, there are other nerves throughout the body that may damaged as well.

Nuropathy foot pain associated with sensory nerves often begins gradually and worsens over time. At first, it can likely be ignored as a discomfort, but often leads to varied levels of intolerance. Hopefully, you seek help early and not after much progression has occurred. Early intervention often leads to the best outcomes.

What Kind of Help Is There for Foot Neuropathy?

The feet are often one of the first “victims” of neuropathic pain. From burning and tingling to crazy itching and prickling. The discomfort can progress to severe pain. The key is to treat before symptoms become severe. Though there is help for severe pain, faster relief can be had when symptoms are not as pronounced.

One of the therapies that has been shown to be effective is neurostimulation. Our team at neuropathydr.com has worked tirelessly to take this to the next level. That’s what led us to create the NDGen neurostimulation system. When the NDGen is combined with our conduction socks (nice and comfy), your feet will know they’ve finally found relief.

If you’d like to know more, we welcome you to learn more here. However, if you’re ready to take the next step in your neuropathy foot pain relief, click here to get to your NDGen and socks. While you’re there, be sure to read about our Reception Room. We welcome you with a 10% discount after your initial purchase. As a member of our Reception Room, you will have access to our clinical support team for support.

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Disuse Syndrome

In our last post, we discussed how exercise can help control the symptoms of your underlying illness (whatever caused your autonomic neuropathy). Today we’re going to discuss the effects of not exercising, which are called disuse syndrome.

Use Vs. Disuse

When you’re thinking about starting an exercise program and you’re thinking about how dangerous it can be, you also need to consider the effects of not starting an exercise program.

The effects of not exercising are called disuse syndrome.  If your level of activity seriously out of sync with your level of inactivity, you can develop:

• Decreased physical work capacity

• Muscle atrophy

• Negative nitrogen and protein balance

• Cardiovascular deconditioning

• Pulmonary restrictions

• Depression

The effects of any of these symptoms of disuse syndrome in combination with your autonomic neuropathy symptoms can make a bad situation even worse.

The very nature of your autonomic neuropathy can affect the systems that are most sensitive to the effects of exercise.  Any exercise program you begin should be designed and monitored by a medical professional well versed in the effects of autonomic neuropathy, like your NeuropathyDR® clinician.

Autonomic neuropathy can have a serious effect on the very systems in the body that are directly affected by exercise.  Make sure you talk to your healthcare provider before you start an exercise program and let them monitor your progress.

For more information on coping with neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to our newsletters at http://neuropathydr.com.

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Motor Neuropathy Care- Long Term Strategies are Key

If you are a regular NeuropathyDR® blog reader, you know that we tend to focus on the latest developments and research in treating neuropathy pain.  With peripheral neuropathy, though, pain is only one component.  This week, we’re going to talk about how neuropathy can affect your muscles, also called motor neuropathy.

There are essentially three kinds of motor neuropathy.  The first is the overall weakening effect of the muscles, especially in the extremities, which often accompanies peripheral neuropathy.  This can occur because the nerves which control motor function in the muscles have become damaged, or—in the case of a compression neuropathy—constricted.  The second kind is called multifocal motor neuropathy, and takes place when the immune system itself begins to attack the nerves, as can happen after a series of infections or after an illness.  The third kind is Hereditary Motor Sensory Neuropathy, which, as the name suggests, is genetic in nature.  Hereditary Motor Sensory Neuropathy, or HMSN, occurs when there is a naturally-occurring deterioration in the nerves that control the muscles, causing the muscles to not be used, become weak, or even atrophy.

Motor neuropathy usually starts in the hands and feet, and can affect the full extension of fingers and toes.  In addition to the dexterity problems this obviously causes, it often also has a visual appearance of “clawlike” fingers.  The condition is degenerative, getting worse over a period of months and years.  Twitching and spasms can also happen in affected limbs.  While motor issues associated with peripheral neuropathy usually accompany pain, tingling, and numbness, multifocal motor neuropathy involves no pain (only the motor nerves are affected).  Generally, none of the varieties of motor neuropathy are life-threatening, although they can absolutely impact your comfort and quality of life if you suffer from them.

When we met our patient Robert, he complained of a steady and declining loss of strength in his feet, which he had experienced over the past 4 years.  Robert had had cancer during that time, culminating in having his prostate removed.  His motor neuropathy caused Robert to have trouble walking or standing for long periods, and he even had trouble feeling his feet on some occasions.  He also complained of shooting pain, tingling, and soreness in his feet, all typical calling cards of peripheral neuropathy.  Since in cases of multifocal motor neuropathy, the sensory nerves are usually unaffected, Robert’s pain and numbness ruled that out.  Sure enough, when we performed a battery of tests, we found that Robert’s sensation to vibration was all but gone in several places on his feet.

Motor Neuropathy is Characterized by Weakness of The Muscles

Robert did not respond with the typical level of relief we usually see after treating a patient with electro-stimulation.  Over the course of three treatment sessions, Robert’s level of strength and comfort in his feet did not change in any meaningful way.  While this is unusual, it highlights an important theme: neuropathy is a complex problem with many symptoms and manifestations, and NO single therapy technique or tool—even those with a very high rate of success—can stand on their own as a complete treatment.

We designed a treatment for Robert intended to produce more long-term benefit, as his short-term progress was not substantial.  Motor neuropathies require an extensive MULTI-MODAL level of treatment, sometimes pharmaceutical and sometimes homeopathic, and usually involving some level of regular exercise and controlled diet.  Robert is currently improving steadily, and is seeing his NeuropathyDR® clinician as prescribed to monitor his condition and progress.

If you suffer from weakness or pain in your limbs, you may have peripheral neuropathy.  If so, we are here to help!  Contact NeuropathyDR® right away and we will help you find the best course of treatment for your specific symptoms.  We can even put you in touch with a specially-trained NeuropathyDR® clinician who can help you develop a therapy plan that will get results.

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/multifocal_neuropathy/multifocal_neuropathy.htm

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/multifocal_neuropathy/multifocal_neuropathy.htm